Artist-in-Residence

I am so pleased to announce that I will be the Artist-in-Residence at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument in ten days. Ten days! Can you believe it?

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So what all does this entail, right? I mean, what even is an artist-in-residence? I have gotten that question A LOT in this whirlwind of a summer, and I love answering it. A residency invites artists to be away from their normal environment to create, make, and be inspired in a new setting. It is a chance for an artist to reflect, research, and even present.

When it comes to the National Parks Service, people like to reference the Hudson River School painters and how they captured America’s wild places. They were in their glory in the mid 19th century, and brought to life America’s landscapes with the clear influence of Romanticism. Wild places still inspire artists, and many National Parks offer an AIR program.

In college, when I learned that this was a way I could share my art and my love for the NPS, it has been a big goal to make it as an AIR.  It has been such an honor and blessing to have been chosen to create at a place that is home to a world class record of ancient mammals and their ecosystems. While I am there, I will be giving a public presentation to the local schools and my big focus will be on the oreodont (pictured below) despite one of my portfolio application images being of a brontothere head mount (pictured above).

So for me, being an AIR gives me a chance to use my art to promote and stick up for our nation’s public lands. What a month to do it in too, after all September is Public Lands Month! My art work will tell a story of the secrets hidden in the land at John Day Fossil Beds and I will bring to life these mammals that once roamed this place.

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I will try to keep this blog updated on my AIR experience between other posts of the many adventures Shane, Jagger, Grizz and I had this summer. Now off to pack!

 

Discovering Radiance

Living starts in-between your ears. It was something like this that my hometown pastor said during Sundays message. He was saying how sometimes before a week even begins, the list of things that must be done can be overwhelming and make you feel far busier or more rushed than you even really are. With my last post being about devotions or meditating on God’s word, for me through sketching, reading various books and making connections, I had to share my thoughts on “living between your own ears”.

In the evening, after that morning message, I was reading “Slow Stitch: Mindful and Contemplative Textile Art” by Claire Wellesley-Smith. I loved how she cited other artists and writers who, whether directly or not, seemed to have this call for the movement of Slow Art. We are surrounded by all these tools these days that are supposed to speed up processes of everything, from cooking to contacting people, but somewhere in that mindfulness has been lost.

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It has taken me twenty-eight years to sort of barely just figure out a little bit better how my own mind works. As an artist, introvert is often a blanket term tossed around, and I am comfortable with that term. Essentially, for me, it is being comfortable with solitude, being alone with out being lonely. In reading Claire’s book, I couldn’t help but connect my solitude, and working in it, with mindfulness. Taking the time to think through a project, a drawing, a painting, a series, gives me a chance to engage with it, sort things out beyond the project and get things sorted out between my ears. The author says something about the long amount of time it takes for her to regain concentration after engaging with external digital media, and I couldn’t agree more, as it can make me completely lose momentum in a drawing or painting.

Beyond my art, connecting more with the idea of lists or schedules like the pastor was pointing out, it can be so distracting to live fast. We can see twenty people’s opinion on a news story on Twitter in under twenty seconds, we can scroll through hundreds of pictures in less than a minute on Instagram, and we can start a group message with people all over the United States and get dozens of replies with in a matter of seconds. Actions that used to take a whole day, like to research or write to someone or about something now can be done in less than fifteen minutes. On this overload of media and images and messages, it can be hard to leave room to take things slow, to meditate on good things, or to be mindful.

Pslam 34:5 Those who look to him are radiant,
    and their faces shall never be ashamed.

This Psalm is how pastor finished his message, and I love it. In the context of today, we have all seen that person in distress from their hectic schedule, trying to keep up, they look exhausted. On the flip side, someone who has just taken the time to get a massage, or a weekend trip, or something, anything that is very deliberately un-rushed, always seem to glow, do they not? Well, what if every day, we took the time to meditate on Him, find that time to be mindful, make deliberate choices, wouldn’t we daily glow?

Start between your ears. Quiet your mind. Put the cellphone away. Pull out a pencil, a needle and thread, a paintbrush or a book and take it slow. You might just find yourself beaming!